Pennsylvania Firearm Owners Association
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  1. #21
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    Default Re: Home medical gear & supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by PAMedic=F|A= View Post
    Yes, but what is there rx policy? I don’t want to be bothered takin fm my fish to the vet.
    No RX needed on fish supplies...

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Home medical gear & supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by lts1ow View Post
    We have a small pharmacy in the house, along with suture kits, TQ's, chest seals, bandages, celox, gloves etc.

    I have debated getting a decom needle but my wife would be the only one who knew how to use it so not sure how valid it would be.

    Will look into the stapler since thats quicker than sutures and I am pretty sure a monkey like me could use it.
    Im just about to order a bunch of stuff today. Sutures, surgery/dissection kit, trauma stuff, etc.

    Building an EMT/field surgeon kinda bag. I may not know how to use it all, but someone will. In the mean time, i can try till i find them.

    Also ordering a couple 3a+ vests.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Home medical gear & supplies

    Chatted with my wife about the stapler, and curious what you folks are thinking its usefulness is?
    Una Salus Victis Nullam Sperare Salutem

  4. #24
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    Doylestown, Pennsylvania
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    Default Re: Home medical gear & supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by PAMedic=F|A= View Post
    It is an Expectorant. It loosens (thins) mucus so coughing can clear your airway passages and your lungs can properly exchange oxygen and co2. Very important in pneumonia.

    Link for below information

    https://alsworldwide.org/care-and-su...ding-pneumonia

    Symptoms of both viral and bacterial pneumonia can be treated with expectorant (not suppressant) cough medicines like Mucinex or Robitussin decongestants or nasal sprays; increased hydration; inhaled medications like Mucomyst or Albuterol; and nebulizers using distilled water, saline solution....






    It works well. Take with water, be properly hydrated. I’d suggest taking it with food. I don’t like it on an empty stomach.
    Good info, thanks.

  5. #25
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    Jan 2013
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    Richboro, Pennsylvania
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    Default Re: Home medical gear & supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by PAMedic=F|A= View Post
    It is an Expectorant. It loosens (thins) mucus so coughing can clear your airway passages and your lungs can properly exchange oxygen and co2. Very important in pneumonia.

    Link for below information

    https://alsworldwide.org/care-and-su...ding-pneumonia

    Symptoms of both viral and bacterial pneumonia can be treated with expectorant (not suppressant) cough medicines like Mucinex or Robitussin decongestants or nasal sprays; increased hydration; inhaled medications like Mucomyst or Albuterol; and nebulizers using distilled water, saline solution....

    It works well. Take with water, be properly hydrated. I’d suggest taking it with food. I don’t like it on an empty stomach.
    Mucinex (guaifenesin) is an expectorant. It thins mucus by increasing the secretion of water and for most lung problems it helps you cough stuff up. I am no expert but AFAIK pneumonia is when your lungs fill with water. I don't think you want to take it then.

    A better choice is taking a Mucolytic. These drugs physically break down the mucus and make it thinner without having to water it down. The drug of choice for this is NAC (N-acetylcystine). You can get it at vitaminshops as a supplement. It comes as 600 mg capsules and you should take 2 a day. I take it every time I start getting congested and it usually clears things up in a couple days. I works a lot better than Mucinex. I once gave some to my daughter who was congested and had a persistent cough. Later that afternoon she told me something like Dad what did you give me? That pill is just making me cough up stuff! I laughed and told her that is what it was supposed to do.

    Expectorants – increase airway water or the volume of airway secretions[3]
    Mucolytics – thin (reduce the viscosity of) the mucus[2]
    Mucokinetics – increase transportability of mucus by cough[2]
    Mucoregulators – suppress underlying mechanisms of mucus hypersecretion[2]

    In general, clearance ability is hampered by the bonding to surfaces (stickiness), and by the viscosity of mucous secretions in the lungs. In turn, the viscosity is dependent upon the concentration of mucoprotein in the secretions.

    Expectorants and mucolytic agents are different types of medication, yet both are intended to promote drainage of mucus from the lungs.

    An expectorant (from the Latin expectorare, to expel or banish) works by signaling the body to increase the amount or hydration of secretions, resulting in more yet clearer secretions and as a byproduct lubricating the irritated respiratory tract.[4]

    One expectorant, guaifenesin, is commonly available in many cough syrups and also as long release tablets. Mucolytics can dissolve thick mucus and are usually used to help relieve respiratory difficulties. They do this by breaking down the chemical bonds between molecules in the mucus.[5] This in turn can lower the viscosity by altering the mucin-containing components.[citation needed]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mucoactive_agent

  6. #26
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    West Chester, Pennsylvania
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    Default Re: Home medical gear & supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by streaker69 View Post
    Eating dinner tonight I looked up and saw that my aloe plant has several fresh offshoots growing. My mom always kept an aloe plant in the house, and I've had this one since my wife and I got married. They're great to have to deal with fresh burns. Just cut off the end of one sprig and squeeze the liquid on the burn. It will help alleviate the pain as well as help it heal.

    Anecdote: When I was a teen on my grandfather's last visits before he died we were at my bench desoldering some parts. I was working on removing a diode from the circuit when the soldering iron slipped and the barrel went right into the fleshy part between my thumb and finger. That was 750F right into my hand. I set the iron down, ran right up and cut off some aloe, squeeze out the juice and rubbed it in real good. I didn't even get a blister.
    Also vitamin E capsule will do the same. Split open a capsule and apply, no more pain and heals.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Home medical gear & supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by lts1ow View Post
    Chatted with my wife about the stapler, and curious what you folks are thinking its usefulness is?
    It is a quicker way to close wounds then fancy stitches. Of course, has to be on a part of the can be stapled.

    Of course, sterilizing the injury is extremely important, you don’t want infections setting in below a closed wound. Make sure you keep iodine (If no allergy). Personally I’d want to use two chemical Disinfectants. And an important part is scrubbing, you cannot just pore it on. Sterile forceps or something else to hold the two by twos will you scrub with them would be needed.
    "Cives Arma Ferant"

    "I know I'm not James Bond, that's why I don't keep a loaded gun under the pillow, or bang Russian spies on a regular basis." - GunLawyer001

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Home medical gear & supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by PAMedic=F|A= View Post
    It is a quicker way to close wounds then fancy stitches. Of course, has to be on a part of the can be stapled.

    Of course, sterilizing the injury is extremely important, you don’t want infections setting in below a closed wound. Make sure you keep iodine (If no allergy). Personally I’d want to use two chemical Disinfectants. And an important part is scrubbing, you cannot just pore it on. Sterile forceps or something else to hold the two by twos will you scrub with them would be needed.
    But that is dependent on the wound not bleeding, no?
    Una Salus Victis Nullam Sperare Salutem

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Home medical gear & supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by Delkal View Post
    Mucinex (guaifenesin) is an expectorant. It thins mucus by increasing the secretion of water and for most lung problems it helps you cough stuff up. I am no expert but AFAIK pneumonia is when your lungs fill with water. I don't think you want to take it then.

    A better choice is taking a Mucolytic. These drugs physically break down the mucus and make it thinner without having to water it down. The drug of choice for this is NAC (N-acetylcystine). You can get it at vitaminshops as a supplement. It comes as 600 mg capsules and you should take 2 a day. I take it every time I start getting congested and it usually clears things up in a couple days. I works a lot better than Mucinex. I once gave some to my daughter who was congested and had a persistent cough. Later that afternoon she told me something like Dad what did you give me? That pill is just making me cough up stuff! I laughed and told her that is what it was supposed to do.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mucoactive_agent
    A mucolytic or combination of the two might be better. I was unaware that there was an OTC mucolytic. Mucinex is a common prescription for the treatment of pneumonia. The problem with pneumonia is less about fluid in the lungs then excess secretions and build up of debris from bacteria than it is about a “fluid” problem. However in explaining it to patients we often use the term “fluid” without fully explaining it, because 1 it is gross, and 2, many people just wouldn’t understand.

    Your concerns would be more applicable and say a congestive heart failure patient. Where you have fluid from the blood vessels leaking into the lungs.

    With pneumonia it is a “fluid” that nasty mix I mentioned above, but it is one that is very thick, and starts to block the smaller airway passages. You need to thin it out so your body can remove it. That is why humidifiers, hot shower, lots of fluids, & nebulizers are recommended. Manual percussion (tapping on the back) is also extremely helpful, and was once a common nursing treatment, but we’ve gotten lazy with all our fancy modern tech, and it is only commonly used with als patients (not manually of course, they get a vibration vest)
    Last edited by PAMedic=F|A=; March 19th, 2020 at 10:54 AM.
    "Cives Arma Ferant"

    "I know I'm not James Bond, that's why I don't keep a loaded gun under the pillow, or bang Russian spies on a regular basis." - GunLawyer001

  10. #30
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Home medical gear & supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by lts1ow View Post
    But that is dependent on the wound not bleeding, no?
    Depends on your definition of bleeding. Blood is of course, sterile, or supposed to be. A little oozing isn’t a problem. Active bleeding is. This however, isn’t really my subject of expertise. I for example have no idea when you would need to stitch in a would drain for example, and you can start to go down a road with stitches that is very much not for the untrained person, however competent. A surgeon can sew blood vessels shut. I would say anyone not extensively trained should have to stick to closing wounds, which is really just using a thread to pull separated pieces of skin together so it can grow closed.
    "Cives Arma Ferant"

    "I know I'm not James Bond, that's why I don't keep a loaded gun under the pillow, or bang Russian spies on a regular basis." - GunLawyer001

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