Pennsylvania Firearm Owners Association
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Levittown, Pennsylvania
    (Bucks County)
    Posts
    7,776
    Rep Power
    21474853

    Default The days of handloading may be numbered.

    I think about the wheelwrights seeing the new cars with pressed-steel rims and wonder how many of them realized they better find another occupation, quickly, as they shaved the spokes on the wheels they were producing.

    This month's Guns & Ammo has an article on Sierra Bullets composite-cased cartridges, TM'd TRUE VELOCITY.

    Intended for military use leaving nothing reusable (brass) for the enemy to re-process and lightening (and increasing) the ammo carrying load, it is now nearing or arrived at commercially available.

    They are recyclable as a plastic and as steel (which forms the primer pocket and rim), but are not reloadable.

    Sierra has a patent. They can be the sole source for the allowed time, allow other manufacturers to produce the shells contingent on use of Sierra bullets, I imagine all manner of business arrangements are possible...all combining to the potential of reloadable ammo disappearing or becoming much more expensive.
    Last edited by Bang; December 14th, 2019 at 12:52 PM.
    Legislating to prevent people's acts is fantasy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    People's Republik, New Jersey
    Posts
    652
    Rep Power
    21474839

    Default Re: The days of handloading may be numbered.

    What does this have to do with reloading?

    I don't buy/use military brass so..?
    Una Salus Victis Nullam Sperare Salutem

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Levittown, Pennsylvania
    (Bucks County)
    Posts
    7,776
    Rep Power
    21474853

    Default Re: The days of handloading may be numbered.

    Jes keeps shavin' them spokes then I guess....
    Legislating to prevent people's acts is fantasy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wayne, Pennsylvania
    (Chester County)
    Posts
    1,462
    Rep Power
    21474849

    Default Re: The days of handloading may be numbered.

    Interesting concept that I read about six months ago - looks like they're moving forward a step at a time which is the way new products enter the market - over time. They've got to work their way through the innovators, the early adopters, the early majority, the late majority, etc. and with fewer newsworthy failures than Tesla.

    The major benefit I see is leaving no empty cases on the battlefield which the enemy could reload - until China steals the technology. Maybe they already have?

    But I don't see the major sources of cartridge, bullet, primer, and loaded round manufacturers adopting this concept and be willing to let their sales of components take an irrevocable slide - particularly when it comes to addressing the demand from reloaders.

    Of course, the older the reloaders get and retire from reloading, it does affect the demand curve for components. The activity in that market has diminished because fewer millennials are replacing them.

    Just my 2 cents...

    Off topic: We just got back from a trip to Cabelas (walked out only with jerky and a swimming pool floatie/vest for a grand kid) and noted that most of the primer boxes there that I looked at are .04-.045 cents per primer! And there's no inflation, right...
    - bamboomaster

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Ambridge, Pennsylvania
    (Beaver County)
    Posts
    2,010
    Rep Power
    21474849

    Default Re: The days of handloading may be numbered.

    Quote Originally Posted by bamboomaster View Post
    Interesting concept that I read about six months ago - looks like they're moving forward a step at a time which is the way new products enter the market - over time. They've got to work their way through the innovators, the early adopters, the early majority, the late majority, etc. and with fewer newsworthy failures than Tesla.

    The major benefit I see is leaving no empty cases on the battlefield which the enemy could reload - until China steals the technology. Maybe they already have?

    But I don't see the major sources of cartridge, bullet, primer, and loaded round manufacturers adopting this concept and be willing to let their sales of components take an irrevocable slide - particularly when it comes to addressing the demand from reloaders.

    Of course, the older the reloaders get and retire from reloading, it does affect the demand curve for components. The activity in that market has diminished because fewer millennials are replacing them.

    Just my 2 cents...

    Off topic: We just got back from a trip to Cabelas (walked out only with jerky and a swimming pool floatie/vest for a grand kid) and noted that most of the primer boxes there that I looked at are .04-.045 cents per primer! And there's no inflation, right...

    The reloaders market is minimal at best. Not even a worthwhile percentage as per bullet and powder manufactures go. Just see how long it was to get a decent supply of components after the ammo shortage. Remember, ammo is and always will be number 1 priority.

    As for primers thats all mark up. I'm still selling primers for $29 a thousand. I havent seen an increase in primer cost in a few years now.
    www.Steelvalleycasting.com is your new home for coated bullets and custom ammo.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    North Penn area, Pennsylvania
    Age
    59
    Posts
    3,518
    Rep Power
    21474849

    Default Re: The days of handloading may be numbered.

    Lead alloy wheel weights have been on the endangered list for 20yrs or more. Lead-free weights have been out for almost as long and they are no damn good for bullet casting and contain some nasty stuff. In fact , my old caster informed me years ago that just a few will ruin a pot of good alloy made from the old stuff. I have several friends in the auto service biz and they supply me with 5gal buckets of their old take-off weights. But ya gotta sort thru them carefully. The lead-free weights also contain powdered tungsten , which will ruin a barrel in short order.

    https://archive.epa.gov/epawaste/haz...ml/nlfwwi.html
    I don't speak English , I talk American!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Richboro, Pennsylvania
    (Bucks County)
    Posts
    1,884
    Rep Power
    21474845

    Default Re: The days of handloading may be numbered.

    I have a feeling the brass cased 30-06 (which was introduced 113 years ago) and the .45ACP (115 years old) will still be going strong when these new rounds are long forgotten.

    I also hope my Grandkids will still be loading for my 45-70 (146 years old) and my 45 Colt (147 years old) firearms.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chambers Hill, Pennsylvania
    (Dauphin County)
    Posts
    249
    Rep Power
    13545988

    Default Re: The days of handloading may be numbered.

    I'm wondering if the intent of the OP is that brass cartridges would become illegal? Which would certainly impact reloading?? for those that have time to reload...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    NEPA, Pennsylvania
    (Wyoming County)
    Posts
    1,862
    Rep Power
    21474843

    Default Re: The days of handloading may be numbered.

    I dont think he's implying that they will become illegal. My take is that they will become obsolete

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Levittown, Pennsylvania
    (Bucks County)
    Posts
    7,776
    Rep Power
    21474853

    Default Re: The days of handloading may be numbered.

    ^^^ Zachary. Thank you.

    Sierra explains that the interiors of these plastic cases can be of various configurations, increasing the efficiency of the chosen propellants. The standard with the TRUE VELOCITY is minus half-inch (<.5 MOA) groups. SDs in single digits, and very small extreme spreads have already been recorded with the product.

    Put it all together, and the potential for True Velocity rounds making brass cartridges obsolete becomes real. If competition shooters win with them against hand loads, I'm pretty sure it's going to effect the market. If demand for them becomes the way to go, brass may become less available.

    Safety is a money-making commodity. As in many endeavors, more will continue to be better. Ranges could insist on factory only. Firearm manufacturers could shift from advising against use of handloads to voiding warranties.

    I don't hold a business MBA. I'm just looking at history of product evolution, marketing changes, consumer demands, legal considerations yet to occur, and it looks like the days of reloading ammo as we knew them may look different in the future.
    Last edited by Bang; December 12th, 2019 at 11:28 PM.
    Legislating to prevent people's acts is fantasy

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Handloading and AR 15 Accuracy
    By Wood Cutter in forum Ammunition & Reloading
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: April 16th, 2011, 08:17 PM
  2. Is the gas operated AR's days numbered?
    By RocketFoot in forum Rifles
    Replies: 64
    Last Post: March 23rd, 2010, 09:08 PM
  3. Handloading For 7.7 x 58 mm Jap
    By Lambo in forum General
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: September 28th, 2007, 12:50 PM
  4. Handloading For RRA LAR 15 NM
    By Lambo in forum General
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: March 7th, 2007, 11:02 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Local gun shops | Local shooting ranges | Philadelphia Shooting Ranges | Philadelphia Gun Shops | Pittsburgh Shooting Ranges | Pittsburgh Gun Shops