Pennsylvania Firearm Owners Association
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 28
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Douglassville, Pennsylvania
    (Berks County)
    Posts
    3,860
    Rep Power
    21474847

    Default Re: Getting back into reloading - what to get?

    Quote Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
    I got a Hornady Progressive Press after all the research I did and it took a little tweaking and learning to get it going, but it's been fine and loading 9mm.

    Part of the reason as I recall to get it was the price, the free bullets, the ease of ordering and acquiring accessories either at Amazon or in person at places like Cabelas or Grices and the fact the Hornady was more versatile with five stations compared to the Dillon 550.

    I do wet tumbling rather than dry and really happy with that and not having lead tainted dust all over.
    What do you do with your waste water? I have on-site septic and am concerned about contaminating the ground here.
    I know where Hunter's been.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North East PA, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,932
    Rep Power
    21474851

    Default Re: Getting back into reloading - what to get?

    I have the Hornady LNL AP. It took some tinkering to get it running. Now that I have it figured out it works great. I've had it about 6 years. I've loaded maybe 40k rounds on it. Mostly 9mm. I've also done quite a bit of 45 and 44 mag. I've even loaded some .300 Win mag. Caliber changes are pretty easy and the powder drop is really accurate. Even the primer system is pretty reliable. I don't use a bullet or case feeder so I don't know how well either of those work. I can average about 400 rounds an hour on it loading 9mm without being in a rush. I think it's a good press for the money. It splits the difference between Lee and Dillon in cost and quality both.
    "Take the guns first, then worry about due process" Trump

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    'burbs, Pennsylvania
    (Bucks County)
    Posts
    642
    Rep Power
    20868185

    Default Re: Getting back into reloading - what to get?

    The 550 letís you run fairly rapid high volume as a progressive press for pistol cartridges, but as a single stage for rifle ammo. This I like.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Tioga County, Pennsylvania
    (Tioga County)
    Posts
    4,440
    Rep Power
    21474847

    Default Re: Getting back into reloading - what to get?

    Quote Originally Posted by Walleye Hunter View Post
    What do you do with your waste water? I have on-site septic and am concerned about contaminating the ground here.
    I pour it out into the woods. I have a lot of woods.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Richboro, Pennsylvania
    (Bucks County)
    Posts
    1,851
    Rep Power
    21474844

    Default Re: Getting back into reloading - what to get?

    Quote Originally Posted by frankski View Post
    The 550 letís you run fairly rapid high volume as a progressive press for pistol cartridges, but as a single stage for rifle ammo. This I like.
    I usually separately size all bottle neck rifle cases (on a single stage RCBS). Then I tumble to remove the lube and check length/trim the cases. After that I use the 550 as a progressive to prime (with no sizing die), charge, seat the bullet, and sometimes separately crimp them. So it takes 2 pulls per round and not 3-4 (+ powder charging). Saves a lot of time over a single stage. Trying to use a progressive as a single stage sucks. They usually have a longer pull and some of the stations are not in a convenient position to singly load the cases. That is why everyone needs a single stage press. Use it to work up your loads. Then when you find a load you like set up the progressive and crank them out.

    One thing about progressives. They take a lot of time to set up when you change cartridges. Plan an hour when you get started (especially if you have to change the primer feeding). You can eventually get it down to 1/2 hour on the 550 if you have some extra toolheads all set up. That is the main reason I have no interest in upgrading. I couldn't imagine taking all afternoon to set up a Dillon 1050 with all of the auto case and bullet feeds and the other fancy stuff every time I swapped cartridges. It does too much. On paper the 1050 can crank out bullets 2-3X faster than a 550............until something goes wrong. Then you have a major problem.

    If you shoot mostly one cartridge and load many thousands of rounds at a time before you swap cartridges get a 1050. But if you load a lot of different cases and just want to load a few hundred of one then a few hundred of another I would take the 550 every time.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Belly of the BEAST, Pennsylvania
    (Montgomery County)
    Posts
    1,121
    Rep Power
    19464067

    Default Re: Getting back into reloading - what to get?

    Quote Originally Posted by Walleye Hunter View Post
    What do you do with your waste water? I have on-site septic and am concerned about contaminating the ground here.
    You could just use an evaporative outdoor water container.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Apolacon Township, Pennsylvania
    (Susquehanna County)
    Age
    73
    Posts
    5,065
    Rep Power
    11447041

    Default Re: Getting back into reloading - what to get?

    Quote Originally Posted by Delkal View Post
    RCBS makes the best single stage press so keep it (you will still use it).

    Dillon makes the best progressives. I had a 550 for over 30 years and have easily cranked out tens of thousands of bullets. Some people like the 650 with the auto advance but I don't miss it.


    Everything else (dies, scales, trimmers, etc) can be a mix of manufacturers.
    I Agree wholeheartedly! My Dillon RL 550 B has been in service since 1990 and handles everything I reload from .32 S&W Long to .308 Win. Plus if you must you can always break the progressive cycle and reload in single single stage batches.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Scenery Hill, Pennsylvania
    (Washington County)
    Age
    31
    Posts
    2,148
    Rep Power
    16161043

    Default Re: Getting back into reloading - what to get?

    I got my hands on a Dillon XL650 about 8 years ago and have never second guessed owning a Dillon. I have loaded thousands of rounds and experienced the greatest customer support. Any time I have called them due to something breaking, even if I am sort of at fault (which I admit), they send me a new part free of charge almost over night.

    I have a case feeder, and will probably get a bullet feeder one day. I experimented with a Hornady bullet feeding die but I it wasn't working consistently with the 9mm 147gr coated Blue Bullets which are my main projectile to load these days for USPSA.

    Get lots of primer tubes. Loading a bunch in advance will make your loading session go faster.

    I have XL650 tool heads set up for 9mm, 45acp, .38 spl, 5.56, .308, and .30-06. I do have a single stage RCBS press but it is mostly for secondary tasks or experimenting.

    I have one powder thrower for pistol and one for rifle that I jump from tool head to tool head.

    It takes me about 10-15 minutes to change calibers, tops! I think I spend more time looking for things than actually converting the press.

    For 5.56 and 308 I have one tool head with a sizing/depriming die and a Dillon rapid trimmer die. I use this die for the prep work. The rapid trimmer is amazing and saves a lot of prep time. Then I switch to the tool head with the powder funnel die, bullet seating die, and crimp die (I load for semi autos mostly). I use the Hornady spray lube for sizing bottle neck cartridges. I have had great success with it because I shake it well and give it 10 minutes to dry. I spray a little in the die and lightly coat the cases, shake them around in a plastic tub, then give them another light spray and shake. Most people that don't like it seem to struggle with the instructions I guess. I don't tumble to remove it, I go right into loading from there. For pistol calibers I use carbide dies and clean then once a year to avoid a stuck case.

    I do the priming for all calibers with the XL650.

    I don't bother sorting 5.56 and .223 brass because I have a load that is safe for both, and yes they can have internal volume differences that change your pressure/velocity depending on who made the case. I checked the volume of 10 different head stamps myself with water to confirm the volume of different manufacturer's cases can vary. Basically if you want to push it with a load, work it up for a certain head stamp and use caution when switching brass or mixing.

    I do sort .308/7.62x51 brass.

    I have a Dillon primer pocket swager for military 5.56 and 9mm brass with those pesky swaged primer pockets.

    For cleaning brass I use a cement mixer filled with 10 lbs of stainless pins, a dash of lemi shine, and a drop of dawn dish soap. Lately though I have been doing smaller batches so I've gone back to using my harbor freight vibratory tumbler with whatever media I have that is old as hell and a squirt of mineral spirits to control dust. I've never removed primers for wet or dry tumbling and never had an issue. Any brass I wet tumble I let sit out to air dry in my dehumidified basement for a few weeks.

    Whatever you buy, get one of the slick LED light strips that mounts under the press head and lights up your cases. So amazing for $30-ish.
    Last edited by JoshIronshaft; November 11th, 2019 at 10:11 PM.
    Life is ten percent what happens to you and ninety percent how you respond to it.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Quakertown, Pennsylvania
    (Bucks County)
    Posts
    1,016
    Rep Power
    21474846

    Default Re: Getting back into reloading - what to get?

    I want to thank everybody who has been contributing. The details of what you are and aren't happy with is really helping. I've been using it to guide my Youtube searching to see up close what you're talking about.

    Quote Originally Posted by Delkal View Post
    RCBS makes the best single stage press so keep it (you will still use it).
    I don't have an RCBS single stage. I did have the progressive, but a former roommate absconded with it, along with most of the other stuff they were supposed to hold onto for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Walleye Hunter View Post
    I also have a bag of .223 brass that you can have to get you started there.

    One other thing...I have heard that shouldered brass is tougher to load and best done manually, one stage at a time. If that is wrong I'd like to hear more input on it.
    Thank you, that is very kind! I'll PM you.

    Quote Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
    I got a Hornady Progressive Press after all the research I did and it took a little tweaking and learning to get it going, but it's been fine and loading 9mm.

    Part of the reason as I recall to get it was the price, the free bullets, the ease of ordering and acquiring accessories either at Amazon or in person at places like Cabelas or Grices and the fact the Hornady was more versatile with five stations compared to the Dillon 550.

    I do wet tumbling rather than dry and really happy with that and not having lead tainted dust all over.
    Quote Originally Posted by Yoder View Post
    I have the Hornady LNL AP. It took some tinkering to get it running. Now that I have it figured out it works great. I've had it about 6 years. I've loaded maybe 40k rounds on it. Mostly 9mm. I've also done quite a bit of 45 and 44 mag. I've even loaded some .300 Win mag. Caliber changes are pretty easy and the powder drop is really accurate. Even the primer system is pretty reliable. I don't use a bullet or case feeder so I don't know how well either of those work. I can average about 400 rounds an hour on it loading 9mm without being in a rush. I think it's a good press for the money. It splits the difference between Lee and Dillon in cost and quality both.
    I'm slightly leaning to the LNL at this point. I like the die locking/quick change bushings for keeping dies ready to use and pre-set. I would also likely get the basic and then add on the accessories over time until I'm up to equivalent of the AP. But I'm still going through Dillon and Hornady videos to see different people's experiences with the various models.

    Thanks again everybody!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Piney twp, Pennsylvania
    (Clarion County)
    Posts
    1,326
    Rep Power
    21474847

    Default Re: Getting back into reloading - what to get?

    Lots of good machines out there today hard to go wrong.
    Over the few decades I've had my Dillon 550 only one part needed replaced. A call to them and I had it in my hands a few days later free. Can remember originally choosing Dillon cause I could use the dies I already had. Utilizing different tool heads changes are pretty easy.
    My 70's era Rock Chucker sits beside it and is used similar to Delkal.
    Very good if you're into forming cases.
    It ain't what they call you, it's what you answer to.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Getting back to Reloading
    By MMH in forum Ammunition & Reloading
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: January 5th, 2013, 09:20 PM
  2. back to reloading 223 rem.
    By fats429 in forum Ammunition & Reloading
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: January 4th, 2013, 12:09 AM
  3. Back to Back OC Events, One With Stroud Township Cop
    By dc dalton in forum Open Carry
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: October 9th, 2010, 01:54 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Local gun shops | Local shooting ranges | Philadelphia Shooting Ranges | Philadelphia Gun Shops | Pittsburgh Shooting Ranges | Pittsburgh Gun Shops