Pennsylvania Firearm Owners Association
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: primers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    rigby, Idaho
    Posts
    2
    Rep Power
    0

    Default primers

    I loaded 50 44 mag brass with magnum pistol primers will they work over 22 grains of imr 4227 or should I dump them and use regular primers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Richboro, Pennsylvania
    (Bucks County)
    Posts
    1,781
    Rep Power
    21474844

    Default Re: primers

    I didn't bother to look up max loads (and you didn't mention what the bullet weighs so it would be pointless). But generally you can use mag primers for all loads if you reduce the charge and work up. Mag primers work best with slower powders.

    If you went straight to the max load and used a mag primer (or any primer) you should pull them and start over. Slowly work up and don't load 50 first try.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    rigby, Idaho
    Posts
    2
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: primers

    o sorry they will 240 grain bullet and the max load says 23.5 grains imr 4227

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Richboro, Pennsylvania
    (Bucks County)
    Posts
    1,781
    Rep Power
    21474844

    Default Re: primers

    IMR 4227 usually doesn't need a mag primer but for a full power 44 mag load it might be the best choice. You are enough under the max load so I don't think you will blow up (famous last words) and the load is probably fine. You might even be able to push it slightly.


    But don't take my word for it. Learn how to read pressure signs and work your load up. And I only load max loads with a chrony to get a reality check. If you have more cases instead of pulling the rounds you already made I would start at 19 grains 4227 then load 20 and 21 grains. At least 5 of each. Check each load for pressure and accuracy. If everything seems fine (and you can still shoot without flinching) then try your 22 grain load.

    I you need more of a kick after 22 grains keep working up to max. But go to smaller 0.5 grain increases and even smaller increases as you approach 23.5. If you have any doubts about pressure stop shooting and pull the hotter bullets.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North East PA, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,883
    Rep Power
    21474851

    Default Re: primers

    I don't know for sure, but I personally wouldn't worry about it. You are still 1.5 gr under max. Especially if it's a Super Redhawk.
    "Take the guns first, then worry about due process" Trump

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Mohnton, Pennsylvania
    (Berks County)
    Posts
    5,853
    Rep Power
    21474848

    Default Re: primers

    Quote Originally Posted by Delkal View Post
    IMR 4227 usually doesn't need a mag primer but for a full power 44 mag load it might be the best choice. You are enough under the max load so I don't think you will blow up (famous last words) and the load is probably fine. You might even be able to push it slightly.


    But don't take my word for it. Learn how to read pressure signs and work your load up. And I only load max loads with a chrony to get a reality check. If you have more cases instead of pulling the rounds you already made I would start at 19 grains 4227 then load 20 and 21 grains. At least 5 of each. Check each load for pressure and accuracy. If everything seems fine (and you can still shoot without flinching) then try your 22 grain load.

    I you need more of a kick after 22 grains keep working up to max. But go to smaller 0.5 grain increases and even smaller increases as you approach 23.5. If you have any doubts about pressure stop shooting and pull the hotter bullets.
    Pressure signs are for rifle calibers. By the time they show up in pistol calibers you are in very dangerous territory. Use a chronograph and when charge increase and velocity increase stop going up the same , you are maxed.

    Cite : The Big Fat Book of 45
    The Gun is the Badge of a Free Man

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    814, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    626
    Rep Power
    3598426

    Default Re: primers

    I've reloaded the 44mag in handguns and rifles for about 29 yrs.
    Mostly use 2400 and once in a while something else ............ I have never used a mag primer for any of the loads

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Richboro, Pennsylvania
    (Bucks County)
    Posts
    1,781
    Rep Power
    21474844

    Default Re: primers

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunsnwater View Post
    Pressure signs are for rifle calibers. By the time they show up in pistol calibers you are in very dangerous territory. Use a chronograph and when charge increase and velocity increase stop going up the same , you are maxed.

    Cite : The Big Fat Book of 45
    I agree its best to work up with a Chrony. Takes all of the guess work out. I have even worked up some loads that are well over the modern book loads. Velocity is in spec the burn rate is perfect so I have been shooting them for years.

    But you can easily see pressure signs in handguns. Pistol primers are thinner and if they are flattened edge to edge you start to worry. And when they start to crater be even more careful. In a revolver you have the added benefit of feeling difficulty with extraction. If the cylinder walls are not trashed you should be able to pop out even the heaviest load with you fingernail.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: February 21st, 2009, 02:28 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Local gun shops | Local shooting ranges | Philadelphia Shooting Ranges | Philadelphia Gun Shops | Pittsburgh Shooting Ranges | Pittsburgh Gun Shops