Pennsylvania Firearm Owners Association
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  1. #1
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    Default A real life argument against trigger locks and forced storage of guns

    The arrogance of politicians is on display here. Recently San Diego has tentatively passed a law requiring that guns not in use or on your person need to safely stored. A final vote will be held August 11th (California law already says that a gun must be locked up if there is a child under 18 in the house or a child under 18 could access the gun).

    Yesterday a burglar broke into a persons house. The father was stabbed while his son was retrieving a gun. Makes you wonder how things might have been different if the state trusted people to make their own decisions on what’s best for them. But this case shows that having to take the time to retrieve a gun can have negative consequences.



    https://www.kusi.com/lake-murray-bur...into-question/

    Lake Murray burglary calls new gun law into question

    SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A burglar who attacked and stabbed a Lake Murray man today during an early-morning confrontation in the victim’s house was fatally shot moments later by the wounded homeowner’s adult son, according to San Diego police.

    This particular case is leading people to question the logic of the San Diego City Attorney Mara Elliot’s new law that would require gun owners to safely store their guns in either a safe or with a trigger device when not in use.

    The home-invasion assault and shooting in the 6300 block of Lake Shore Drive was reported shortly before 6:30 a.m. Patrol officers arrived to find a 54-year old resident on the floor of the house, suffering from stab wounds to his upper body, Lt. Anthony Dupree said. Paramedics took the victim to a hospital, where he was admitted in stable condition.

    The body of the 38-year-old suspected burglar was found in a backyard pool, into which he apparently had fallen after fleeing the home, mortally wounded. His name was withheld pending family notification.

    Homicide detectives were called in to take charge of the case. “Although it is early in the investigation, we have learned the homeowner confronted the (intruder) who had entered his home,” Dupree said.

    “The suspect began assaulting the homeowner, at which point the homeowner’s 20-year old son retrieved a firearm and shot the intruder.”

    The situation is making residents think twice about the new law that, if it were already in effect, could have altered the outcome of this burglary.
    Proof Armed citizens make a difference. http://forum.pafoa.org/showthread.php?t=316012

  2. #2
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    Default Re: A real life argument against trigger locks and forced storage of guns

    In case anyone wants to know more about the law San Diego is trying to implement about storage of guns. Notice how they plan to enforce it.


    https://fox5sandiego.com/2019/07/15/...un-safety-law/

    Council passes ordinance requiring guns to be stored in locked container
    Posted 11:58 AM, July 15, 2019, by FOX 5 Digital Team and Jaime Chambers, Updated at 09:30PM, July 15, 2019
    New Gun Safety Rules Approved

    SAN DIEGO -- The San Diego City Council Monday tentatively approved an ordinance that would require gun owners to store guns in a locked container or disable them with a trigger lock when not in use or being worn on their person.

    City Attorney Mara Elliott proposed the ordinance last month with the intention of reducing accidental shootings, children's access to guns and suicides. According to Elliott, 46% of gun owners in the U.S. who have children do not secure their guns and 73% of youngsters aged 9 and under know where their parents keep their guns.

    Since 2002, the state has mandated that all guns sold in California have an accompanying trigger lock approved by the state Department of Justice's Bureau of Firearms. Elliott said the ordinance is a "common-sense approach" to building on current state requirements.

    The proposal's supporters and opponents gave public comment on the proposal for nearly two hours before the council's 6-2 vote. The measure's supporters included gun control advocacy groups like San Diegans for Gun Violence Prevention and Never Again California as well as Assemblyman Todd Gloria, D-San Diego.

    Wendy Wheatcroft, founder of San Diegans for Gun Violence Prevention, framed the ordinance as a way to keep military veterans, first responders and law enforcement officers from committing suicide in addition to keeping guns away from children. As of June 19, 97 police officers and 46 firefighters have killed themselves in the U.S. since the beginning of this year, according to Wheatcroft.

    "We need to attack this from all angles, not just locking up firearms but also making sure they have adequate mental health support," Wheatcroft said. "But we also need to be reducing the means and the access to a firearm because in a moment of crisis, even having that gun locked up can be the difference between life and death."

    The proposal's opponents said it infringes on their Second Amendment rights, particularly for gun owners who do not have children living with them. Under current state law, gun owners are required to keep firearms in a secure container or disabled with a device like a trigger lock only if they live with a person who cannot legally have a weapon under state or federal law.

    Opponents also argued the proposal is unenforceable and that locking a gun in a safe would make it difficult to access and use in a moment of self- defense. Wendy Hauffen, executive administrator for the San Diego County Gun Owners political action committee, suggested breaking the law should be an infraction rather than a felony or misdemeanor.

    "This will allow the storage conversation to be had, which is stated as one of the purposes for passing this regulation, while not filling jails full of violators," Hauffen said. "Criminalizing normal activity has the potential to ruin a lot of innocent lives and this is especially a concern in a city like San Diego, where we have so many residents such as active-duty military, who come from so many other states where this kind of law doesn't and would never exist."

    According to Elliott, the San Diego Police Department will enforce the law by finding improperly stored guns in a home during a visit for another reason such as a domestic disturbance. Elliott compared the proposal to the state's 1986 law requiring drivers to wear a seatbelt; at that time, highway patrol officers could only cite drivers for not wearing a seatbelt during a traffic stop for another infraction.

    City Councilwoman Jennifer Campbell, a longtime family physician, said she supported the ordinance due to the caliber of weapons currently available to the public and because guns are too easy for children to access in many homes.

    "We need to teach our children safety, we need to protect them from themselves," she said. "When they get emotionally upset, they may go find that gun, and they always know where they are."

    City Councilwomen Vivian Moreno and Barbara Bry voted in favor of the bill at the June 5 meeting of the council's Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods Committee, sending it to the full council without recommendation. City Councilman Chris Cate was the only member of the four-member committee to vote against the proposal, calling it unnecessary, overreaching and difficult to enforce.

    Cate and City Councilman Scott Sherman voted against the ordinance Monday, with City Councilman Mark Kersey absent. The technically nonpartisan council's six Democrats -- including Campbell, Moreno and Bry -- all voted in favor. Sherman suggested the solution to curbing accidental gun deaths is gun safety education for children and young adults.

    "In World War II, 90% of the kids going into the military were proficient in firearm use. Today, it's about 30," Sherman said. "Most of them have never touched a gun in their life or know the consequences of what a gun can do because nobody has taught them."

    The vote is the first of two required for the ordinance to become law, allowing residents a second opportunity to comment on the proposal. The council did not indicate if it plans to hold the second vote prior to the beginning of its summer recess on Aug. 7.
    Proof Armed citizens make a difference. http://forum.pafoa.org/showthread.php?t=316012

  3. #3
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    Default Re: A real life argument against trigger locks and forced storage of guns

    Quote Originally Posted by internet troll View Post
    The arrogance of politicians is on display here. Recently San Diego has tentatively passed a law requiring that guns not in use or on your person need to safely stored. A final vote will be held August 11th (California law already says that a gun must be locked up if there is a child under 18 in the house or a child under 18 could access the gun).

    Yesterday a burglar broke into a persons house. The father was stabbed while his son was retrieving a gun. Makes you wonder how things might have been different if the state trusted people to make their own decisions on what’s best for them. But this case shows that having to take the time to retrieve a gun can have negative consequences.



    https://www.kusi.com/lake-murray-bur...into-question/

    Lake Murray burglary calls new gun law into question

    SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A burglar who attacked and stabbed a Lake Murray man today during an early-morning confrontation in the victim’s house was fatally shot moments later by the wounded homeowner’s adult son, according to San Diego police.

    This particular case is leading people to question the logic of the San Diego City Attorney Mara Elliot’s new law that would require gun owners to safely store their guns in either a safe or with a trigger device when not in use.

    The home-invasion assault and shooting in the 6300 block of Lake Shore Drive was reported shortly before 6:30 a.m. Patrol officers arrived to find a 54-year old resident on the floor of the house, suffering from stab wounds to his upper body, Lt. Anthony Dupree said. Paramedics took the victim to a hospital, where he was admitted in stable condition.

    The body of the 38-year-old suspected burglar was found in a backyard pool, into which he apparently had fallen after fleeing the home, mortally wounded. His name was withheld pending family notification.

    Homicide detectives were called in to take charge of the case. “Although it is early in the investigation, we have learned the homeowner confronted the (intruder) who had entered his home,” Dupree said.

    “The suspect began assaulting the homeowner, at which point the homeowner’s 20-year old son retrieved a firearm and shot the intruder.”

    The situation is making residents think twice about the new law that, if it were already in effect, could have altered the outcome of this burglary.

    Definitely going to have to drain that pool now.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: A real life argument against trigger locks and forced storage of guns

    “Although it is early in the investigation, we have learned the homeowner confronted the (intruder) who had entered his home,” Dupree said...
    RIGHT THERE is the problem!
    The problem isn't the lack of immediate access to guns! The problem is MACHO MEN who think they can just confront someone who comes into their home uninvited! GO TO YOUR ROOM AND CALL THE POLICE! This guy could have been looking for food - maybe open your heart and home to those less fortunate instead of blowing them away!!!

  5. #5
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    Default Re: A real life argument against trigger locks and forced storage of guns

    You know it dawned on me, the people who are demanding "Common Sense Gun Laws" are not against guns or pro gun safety, rather they are against the Right to Life. They don't want underlings to protect their lives, and they want them to abort their unborn. They are against the very basic building block of human rights, that very right to life. I think I'm going to start using that augment on freedom grabbers "why are you against my right to life, do you value your life so little as to think YOU don't have the right to life, and to protect that life?"

  6. #6
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    Default Re: A real life argument against trigger locks and forced storage of guns

    Quote Originally Posted by Emptymag View Post
    RIGHT THERE is the problem!
    The problem isn't the lack of immediate access to guns! The problem is MACHO MEN who think they can just confront someone who comes into their home uninvited! GO TO YOUR ROOM AND CALL THE POLICE! This guy could have been looking for food - maybe open your heart and home to those less fortunate instead of blowing them away!!!
    You are joking, right?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: A real life argument against trigger locks and forced storage of guns

    Quote Originally Posted by marinville View Post
    You are joking, right?
    Relatively certain that's sarcasm

  8. #8
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    Default Re: A real life argument against trigger locks and forced storage of guns

    The answer is in the last paragraph of the news article. Should start with Eddie Eagle in early education.
    Sherman suggested the solution to curbing accidental gun deaths is gun safety education for children and young adults.

    "In World War II, 90% of the kids going into the military were proficient in firearm use. Today, it's about 30," Sherman said. "Most of them have never touched a gun in their life or know the consequences of what a gun can do because nobody has taught them."
    Illegitimus non carborundum est

  9. #9
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    Default Re: A real life argument against trigger locks and forced storage of guns

    Quote Originally Posted by Emptymag View Post
    RIGHT THERE is the problem!
    The problem isn't the lack of immediate access to guns! The problem is MACHO MEN who think they can just confront someone who comes into their home uninvited! GO TO YOUR ROOM AND CALL THE POLICE! This guy could have been looking for food - maybe open your heart and home to those less fortunate instead of blowing them away!!!
    Says a guy who goes by Emptymag.
    Psalms 73:26

  10. #10
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    Default Re: A real life argument against trigger locks and forced storage of guns

    How about making a law that parents are CRIMINALLY REPSONSIBLE if a child got to the gun instead?

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