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Thread: Glock 43x

  1. #1
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    Default Glock 43x

    Got my permit in the mail yesterday and went to start looking for a gun. I went to a gun shop to look at a Taurus. I held it and it was just too small and felt uncomfortable in my hands. Being a newbie I don't know anything about guns. The salesman recommend a Glock 43x. It felt nice in my hands but I'm concerned because there isn't a manual safety. I'm concerned I'm going to fire it by accident.
    Would someone have any recommendation of a nice first gun similar to a Glock 43x or is the Glock a decent first gun?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Glock 43x

    A Glock has a lot of safeties, the safeties disengage when you pull the trigger.

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    Default Re: Glock 43x


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Glock 43x

    This sounds a lot like your first gun...

    If so, here's a tip...

    Don't buy a small gun. It's going to be harder to shoot, and it's just not going to be conducive to learning how to shoot.

    If you must buy a carry sized gun, go for a compact rather than a single stack or subcompact. It'll be a bit harder to conceal, but a lot easier to shoot and learn on. Guns in the class include the Glock 19, HK USP Compact, SIG P229...

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Glock 43x

    I hate to double post but, here are some tips for buying a first gun...

    1) Just because a guy works at a gun shop doesn't mean that he knows his stuff. Sadly, it's almost more likely that he doesn't. He may not always have your best interest in mind either.

    2) Don't feel pressured to buy a gun right then and there. You're probably going to need some time to compare things, look things up, and visit other shops that might carry different guns.

    3) As mentioned before, do not buy a small gun as your first gun (small would be considered a Glock 26 or Glock 43). Full sized guns (like a Glock 17) or compact guns (like a Glock 19) are easier to shoot and learn on. They will have less recoil, more grip for better control, and a longer sight radius makes it easier to aim and shoot accurately, as well as a larger magazine capacity.

    4) 9mm should be your starting caliber. It's cheap, available, relatively easy to shoot.

    5) The primary purpose of a manual safety (or even a Glock style trigger safety) is not to prevent you from pulling the trigger accidentally. It is to prevent the inertia of the trigger from firing it as the gun impacts the ground. You must strictly adhere to the 4 rules of firearms safety no matter what firearm you are shooting.

    6) As you try the gun in a store, run through a checklist of things and see how they feel. This includes...
    Grip: How does it feel in your hand? Too big, or too small? What about the texture? It should be aggressive enough to keep the gun in place under recoil. Yet, some will consider some textures too aggressive (uncomfortable without gloves). Does the grip allow for a high grip (relative to the barrel)? Generally, the closer your grip is in height to the barrel, the faster it will be to get back on target. Keep in mind many grips are now modular to better fit you.
    Sights: What are the sights made out of? Metal is typically better, but you can replace them later on (with the proper tools and know how). Are they night sights? What about dots and outlines? Any markings (dots or otherwise) on the sight should be enough to get your attention for quick acquisition, but not too much as to distract your focus from the front sight. Does the gun point naturally? Some people like to close their eyes, and point the gun in a safe direction, then open them and see where the sights are. This might reveal some deficiencies in the grip. If you're pointing low, the grip may be too straight (too little of an angle). If it's high, it might be too steep (too much of an angle).
    Trigger: How does the trigger break (ask for permission to dry fire, ensure the firearm is pointed in a safe direction, and make sure it is clear)? Is it crisp and light enough for you? Is it too light? What about finger placement/trigger reach? The classic advise is to get the pad (i.e. neither the tip or the crease) of your finger on there. If you can't, the trigger might be too far forward, or the grip too big. You might want to try to feel for the reset (after dry firing, keep the trigger pinned to the rear, and cycle the slide. Then, slowly let the trigger forward. You should feel a point where the trigger is ready to go). When you feel the trigger reset, consider if the distance as well as tactile and audible feedback are satisfactory.
    Controls: Are they easy to actuate and conveniently located? They may be too easy to actuate. You don't want to accidentally ride the slide stop, or bump the magazine release while shooting.
    Action: Most people prefer striker fired actions since they're consistent and simple to shoot, but you don't need to go that way. If you go hammer fired, consider that you will likely need to learn how to disengage a safety or shoot with multiple different trigger pulls, both of which are harder. There are a couple of exceptions to that (like DAO guns including HK LEM).
    Accessory cost: How expensive are accessories (namely, magazines)? Is it something you can afford?

    7) Try and see if there's a local range where you can rent the guns you're interested in to take them for a spin. As you try them, consider how well they point to the target, how their recoil feels, how easy it is to get back on target, and which gun you shoot the best.

    8) Chances are, whatever you choose, it's going to be the wrong gun. You just don't know enough right now to know what you really want. If you're having a tough time choosing, don't stress over it too much. Pick what seems reasonable, and start saving now for your next gun/

    9) For your safety, enjoyment, and learning benefit, consider finding a reputable instructor.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Glock 43x

    Am I the only one confused by the OPs opening sentence?
    DDG-8 "Sine Timore"

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Glock 43x

    First Gun ? I always recommend starting off with a Revolver !

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Glock 43x

    Quote Originally Posted by MARINE DIVISION TWO View Post
    First Gun ? I always recommend starting off with a Revolver !
    And go to a range that rents guns. Try them out, compare groupings and how they feel. Maybe take an introductory course to learn about safety.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Glock 43x

    Quote Originally Posted by bripro View Post
    Am I the only one confused by the OPs opening sentence?
    I'm confused about what why you are confused by my opening sentence. It made more sense to me to apply for my permit first before buying a gun. I don't see how you could get confused.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Glock 43x

    Quote Originally Posted by TooBigToFit View Post
    This sounds a lot like your first gun...

    If so, here's a tip...

    Don't buy a small gun. It's going to be harder to shoot, and it's just not going to be conducive to learning how to shoot.

    If you must buy a carry sized gun, go for a compact rather than a single stack or subcompact. It'll be a bit harder to conceal, but a lot easier to shoot and learn on. Guns in the class include the Glock 19, HK USP Compact, SIG P229...
    ...Sig 320, HK VP9, M&P 2.0...good advice above, but I would steer you more toward striker-fired guns, there is less to learn.

    Also, I would recommend 9mm for starters. It is adequately effective (in handgun terms) with modern carry ammunition, and cost effective to shoot.
    Focus on getting a quality handgun, for the most part stick to manufacturer's magazines, and spend your money on ammunition and training.

    You might want to look at the Glock G48. It is the same grip as the G43X, but has a Glock 19 slide length. It runs the "small side" of the "middle of the road" suggestion above

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