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  1. #11
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    Default Re: Anybody using power saws to butcher?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yoder View Post
    The only thing that sucks about a sawzall is if the deer moves with the saw it doesn't cut.
    You gotta make sure they're dead first.
    My wife was bent about the paint on the blade, that is why I took it off.
    Last edited by bigandy1966; September 19th, 2017 at 12:37 PM.

  2. #12
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    Mar 2017
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    Coal twp, Pennsylvania
    (Northumberland County)
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    Default Re: Anybody using power saws to butcher?

    Reciprocating saw here too.
    Member of Zerbe Township Rod & Gun Club.

  3. #13
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    Bacliff
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    Default Re: Anybody using power saws to butcher?

    i would urge everyone that can butcher their own meat, do so. and stay away from the spinal cord with the saw blade. you take your kill to a butcher that is butchering many deer, there is a greater risk for spread from that butcher to your kill. i'm just saying. ...

    CDC Now Recommends Strongly consider having the deer or elk tested for CWD before you eat the meat

    Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)

    Prevention

    If CWD could spread to people, it would most likely be through eating of infected deer and elk. In a 2006-2007 CDC survey of U.S. residents, nearly 20 percent of those surveyed said they had hunted deer or elk and more than two-thirds said they had eaten venison or elk meat. However, to date, no CWD infections have been reported in people.

    Hunters must consider many factors when determining whether to eat meat from deer and elk harvested from areas with CWD, including the level of risk they are willing to accept. Hunters harvesting wild deer and elk from areas with reported CWD should check state wildlife and public health guidance to see whether testing of animals is recommended or required in a given state or region. In areas where CWD is known to be present, CDC recommends that hunters strongly consider having those animals tested before eating the meat.

    Tests for CWD are monitoring tools that some state wildlife officials use to look at the rates of CWD in certain animal populations. Testing may not be available in every state, and states may use these tests in different ways. A negative test result does not guarantee that an individual animal is not infected with CWD, but it does make it considerably less likely and may reduce your risk of exposure to CWD.

    To be as safe as possible and decrease their potential risk of exposure to CWD, hunters should take the following steps when hunting in areas with CWD:

    Do not shoot, handle or eat meat from deer and elk that look sick or are acting strangely or are found dead (road-kill). When field-dressing a deer: Wear latex or rubber gloves when dressing the animal or handling the meat. Minimize how much you handle the organs of the animal, particularly the brain or spinal cord tissues. Do not use household knives or other kitchen utensils for field dressing. Check state wildlife and public health guidance to see whether testing of animals is recommended or required. Recommendations vary by state, but information about testing is available from many state wildlife agencies. Strongly consider having the deer or elk tested for CWD before you eat the meat. If you have your deer or elk commercially processed, consider asking that your animal be processed individually to avoid mixing meat from multiple animals. If your animal tests positive for CWD, do not eat meat from that animal. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service regulates commercially farmed deer and elk. The agency operates a national CWD herd certification program. As part of the voluntary program, states and individual herd owners agree to meet requirements meant to decrease the risk of CWD in their herds. Privately owned herds that do not participate in the herd certification program may be at increased risk for CWD.

    Page last reviewed: August 17, 2017 Page last updated: August 17, 2017 Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology (DHCPP)

    https://www.cdc.gov/prions/cwd/prevention.html


    > However, to date, no CWD infections have been reported in people.


    key word here is 'reported'. science has shown that CWD in humans will look like sporadic CJD. SO, how can one assume that CWD has not already transmitted to humans? they can't, and it's as simple as that. from all recorded science to date, CWD has already transmitted to humans, and it's being misdiagnosed as sporadic CJD. ...terry


    LOOKING FOR CWD IN HUMANS AS nvCJD or as an ATYPICAL CJD, LOOKING IN ALL THE WRONG PLACES $$$

    *** These results would seem to suggest that CWD does indeed have zoonotic potential, at least as judged by the compatibility of CWD prions and their human PrPC target. Furthermore, extrapolation from this simple in vitro assay suggests that if zoonotic CWD occurred, it would most likely effect those of the PRNP codon 129-MM genotype and that the PrPres type would be similar to that found in the most common subtype of sCJD (MM1).***

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/...124?src=recsys

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/1...eedAccess=true

    Molecular Barriers to Zoonotic Transmission of Prions

    *** chronic wasting disease, there was no absolute barrier to conversion of the human prion protein.

    *** Furthermore, the form of human PrPres produced in this in vitro assay when seeded with CWD, resembles that found in the most common human prion disease, namely sCJD of the MM1 subtype.

    http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/20/...58_article.htm

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...-zoonotic.html


    snip...see full text ;


    TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2017

    CDC Now Recommends Strongly consider having the deer or elk tested for CWD before you eat the meat

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...-consider.html

    besides the spinal cord and cns, muscle meat and fat is infections with cwd. but some of you might want to go back to the old days with BSE and read up some there. some might find interest. now there is much new science now, the fact that atypical and typical bse and atypical and typical scrapie have been linked to sporadic cjd, but this old data on offal and MRM's you might find interest...

    http://bseinquiry.blogspot.com/2017/...risk-from.html

    http://bseinquiry.blogspot.com/2017/...cement-of.html


    *** Transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to a chimpanzee by electrodes contaminated during neurosurgery ***

    Gibbs CJ Jr, Asher DM, Kobrine A, Amyx HL, Sulima MP, Gajdusek DC. Laboratory of Central Nervous System Studies, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892.

    Stereotactic multicontact electrodes used to probe the cerebral cortex of a middle aged woman with progressive dementia were previously implicated in the accidental transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) to two younger patients. The diagnoses of CJD have been confirmed for all three cases. More than two years after their last use in humans, after three cleanings and repeated sterilisation in ethanol and formaldehyde vapour, the electrodes were implanted in the cortex of a chimpanzee. Eighteen months later the animal became ill with CJD. This finding serves to re-emphasise the potential danger posed by reuse of instruments contaminated with the agents of spongiform encephalopathies, even after scrupulous attempts to clean them.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Abstract


    kind regards, terry

  4. #14
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    (Dauphin County)
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    Default Re: Anybody using power saws to butcher?

    I bone mine out. Never even need to cut through any bone. I use 2 knives.
    MSgt, USAF (Ret)

  5. #15
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    Oct 2007
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    Default Re: Anybody using power saws to butcher?

    I use a good 'ol fashion butcher's saw just for removing from the knee down. I use a axe to split joints and a boning knife for everything else.
    The closest I get to the spine is for the backstraps and tenderloins. I used to keep a neck roast but I don't even do that anymore.

  6. #16
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    Jun 2017
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    People's Republik, New Jersey
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    Default Re: Anybody using power saws to butcher?

    Quote Originally Posted by 509thsfs View Post
    I bone mine out. Never even need to cut through any bone. I use 2 knives.
    This, have an old OKC skinning knife and a rat3 I use to cut the rest up.

    May take longer but I can get some nice clean cuts out versus tearing meat up.
    Una Salus Victis Nullam Sperare Salutem

  7. #17
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    Feb 2012
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    Coal country, Pennsylvania
    (Carbon County)
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    Default Re: Anybody using power saws to butcher?

    We use a saws-all to split em in half after skinning. One cut down the backbone.

  8. #18
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    Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
    (Dauphin County)
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    Default Re: Anybody using power saws to butcher?

    I have never used a saw to cut any bone. I use one knife to field dress, usually the same knife to skin, then a little heavier knife to quarter the animal. Then sit in the fridge for a few days before I debone, wrap and freeze. Why are you cutting bone? Why do you need a saw?

    If you want to cut off the legs before you hang, skin and quarter to make things easier, you can simply cut at the joints with your knife and then you saw no bone.

    I have always read that bone dust/fragments can make the meat taste bad. Just need the correct knives and then no need for a saw.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Lancaster, Pennsylvania
    (Lancaster County)
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    Default Re: Anybody using power saws to butcher?

    Quote Originally Posted by Feddog82 View Post
    There is absolutely NO reason to leave bones in your butchered deer meat!
    I can think of a few. Ribs, Frenched rib backstraps, shanks for stews, whole leg quarters for braising or smoking come to mind immediately.
    "You can't stop insane people from doing insane things by passing insane laws--that's insane!" -- Penn Jillette

    "To my mind it is wholly irresponsible to go into the world incapable of preventing violence, injury, crime, and death. How feeble is the mindset to accept defenselessness. How unnatural. How cheap. How cowardly. How pathetic." -- Ted Nugent

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    FTKC, Pennsylvania
    (Butler County)
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    Default Re: Anybody using power saws to butcher?

    A sawzall for the rough cuts. Feet, spine and splitting the pelvis. A band saw for cutting steaks. The front legs make nice bone in steaks.

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