Pennsylvania Firearm Owners Association
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  1. #1
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    Default First Time Re-Blueing/Repairing, Any tips?

    I got a 20g pump Stevens 77D from my grandfather that had been sitting around his attack for a few years going unused. He hadn't been using it because I guess he went to shoot it once and it the pump didn't go forward all the way and when it shot it blew out the right extractor pin and opened up.

    When I grabbed it it had light rusting along the barrel and the wood stock didn't look all that pretty.

    So far I've completely removed, sanded down, and refinished the wood stock and it looks beautiful now. I've also ordered and replaced the right extractor/spring/plunger.

    So the part I'm at now that I'd like some tips on are for starters with the mechanical end. Internally everything looks good and rust free and i have it well oiled/lubed and it all moves freely. Is there anything specific I should be double checking in relation to what would have caused it to not lock forward correctly? or was that probably more just a mistake made by my grandfather?

    Also, since the barrel was rusty I would like to clean it up and re-blue it, does anyone have any tips or suggestions as far as what type of blueing I should use, hot or cold, methods/techniques?

    I'd really love to be able to get this gun looking fantastic and working fantastic to be able to show my grandfather, think he'd really enjoy that.

    Thanks in advance for anything you can offer to help!

  2. #2
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    Feb 2010
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    Levittown, Pennsylvania
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    Default Re: First Time Re-Blueing/Repairing, Any tips?

    Most guns are designed to preclude ignition out of battery. I think your first item is find out if that is true of that gun, and if so, what is wrong.

    If you do not have hot bluing equipment look into a rust blue process, if you have the fine wirewheel to card it off. If cold blue will suffice, I am impressed with Van's Instant Gun Blue.
    Last edited by Bang; September 15th, 2013 at 12:12 PM. Reason: added bluing comment

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Bethel, Pennsylvania
    (Berks County)
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    Default Re: First Time Re-Blueing/Repairing, Any tips?

    For a first rate job on a large piece like an entire firearm, hot bluing is the way to go. Finding a shop that does it and the cost may be more than the gun is worth.

    Cold blues are great for touching up small pieces, but usuallly give poor results on large pieces. The finish can get uneven and look splotchy or different colors.

    I have used quite a few brands of cold blues, current favorite is Blue Wonder.

    As with any metal finish, good metal preparation is the key. If it says "degrease" make sure it is degreased!

    Good luck.
    "Disperse you Rebels! Damn you! Throw down your Arms and Disperse!" British Major Pitcairn at Lexington April 19, 1775

    "Sometimes reasonable men must do unreasonable things" Marvin Heemeyer

  4. #4
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    Default Re: First Time Re-Blueing/Repairing, Any tips?

    I had came across something somewhere on here about putting the barrel in the oven to hot blue it, bad idea? and not sure what your calling whole firearm, only part i'm looking to do is the barrel, everything else on it is fine. would just that be easier?

    And possibly a stupid question but would there be a down side to just sanding it down de-greasing it and then primer/spray paint/clear coat it? Top of my head I'm thinking heat would be an issue.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: First Time Re-Blueing/Repairing, Any tips?

    I had came across something somewhere on here about putting the barrel in the oven to hot blue it, bad idea?
    There are basically 2 types of bluing process.

    1. A shop that specialized in bluing. This is a HOT chemical process that requires multiple tanks and chemicals. Lots of prep work and buffing. It can be costly compared to the price of the firearm to be blued.

    2. Home process/buy it yourself COLD blue creams, pastes and liquids. You do the work and apply them yourself. Some of the cold blue chemicals say for best results to heat the metal first (usually with a heat gun) but it depends on the brand.

    My opinion.

    If you are only looking at doing the barrel, I would do some research and select a brand of cold blue and try it yourself.

    Follow all of the directions to the letter for the best results and see what happens.

    And possibly a stupid question but would there be a down side to just sanding it down de-greasing it and then primer/spray paint/clear coat it?
    Getting reqular paint to stick to smooth steel won't work. Now there are several brands of paints for gun finishing. Duracoat is one and KG Gunkote is another. Guncoat is a paint you bake afterwards to harden and cure. I have used both in the past and prefer the Gunkote bake methods.

    For the best results and adhesion of the paint, sand blasting (bead or alum oxide) should be done to prep the metal.
    "Disperse you Rebels! Damn you! Throw down your Arms and Disperse!" British Major Pitcairn at Lexington April 19, 1775

    "Sometimes reasonable men must do unreasonable things" Marvin Heemeyer

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania
    (Carbon County)
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    Default Re: First Time Re-Blueing/Repairing, Any tips?

    Look in Brownell's catalog for their Rust Blueing. You can use a piece of steel rain gutter and suspend the barrel in it on stainless wire. Two cheap propane screw on camp stoves and some steel wool will get it done on the cheap. Rust blueing is true blueing, just slower and more labor. Soak the steel wool in gas or something to degrease and let dry before use. You can do some nice work, but like bodywork or hot blueing, the initial polishing is what determines the outcome. you can get away with using 600 grit sandpaper.

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